Category Archives: TV and Film

Forgotten Filmcast Episode 153: Maniac

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

On episode 153 of the Forgotten Filmcast, Todd is joined by Jack Criddle from Play Morricone for Me to look at one of the strangest films we’ve ever covered on the show. Get ready for 1934’s Maniac, from the grandfather of exploitation cinema, Dwain Esper. Some have called it one of the worst films ever made, so brace yourselves.

Download the Show:
iTunes
Podomatic

Show Notes:
Play Morricone for Me
Jack on Twitter

Music:
“Protofunk” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



Forgotten Filmcast Episode 152: Eyes of Laura Mars

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

On the new episode of the Forgotten Filmcast, Todd is joined by Vince Leo from Around the World in 80’s Movies to look at a film originally written by John Carpenter, but he has since disowned it. Join us for 1978’s Eyes of Laura Mars, directed by Irvin Kershner, director of The Empire Strikes Back!

Download the Show:
iTunes
Podomatic
Your Listen

Show Notes:
Around the World in 80’s Movies
Vince on Twitter

Music:
“Protofunk” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



An Evening With John Cleese

This article is from 80sNostalgia.com. Click the title to hop over there.

For people like me who enjoy Comiccons, 80s conventions and live events, lockdown has been a nightmare. When I first heard that John Cleese was coming to Manchester for An Evening With John Cleese, I was overjoyed. Skeptical, I will admit, but also overjoyed. I hadn’t been in a room with many people for over a year, so how would Monopoly Events handle a closed event like this?

The answer was, perfectly.

I arrived at Manchester BEC Arena, and was so pleased to see the event itself was in a side area rather than the main hall. This new side area gave the 300 or so ticket holders enough space so nobody felt too close in the waiting area, and the area in which John’s Q&A was held was perfectly sized for the audience numbers.

Now, a bit of background about me; John Cleese was one of my idols when I was young. I was a huge Monty Python fan, I had Clockwise, The Life Of Brian, And Now For Something Completely Different on video, and most of the Fawlty Towers episodes memorised line for line which my friends and I would recite. John Cleese is a comedy genius. There is always a worry when you meet idols, in that they might not live up to your expectations. John, however, was fantastic.

To set the scene for the evening, inside the Q&A area there was a low stage with a huge screen surrounding it. There were a limited number of seats, maybe 300 or so max, and each seat was allocated to a specific ticket or group if tickets had been booked together.

The host for the evening was Tom Finkill who did a fantastic job of ensuring John didn’t go off track and of putting great questions to John. Tom seemed to know his stuff when it came to John’s career, which gave a friendly warmth to his hosting.

The schedule for the evening was for John to give an hour long chat, then take questions from the audience, before people were able to have items signed by him. There was also a John Cleese themed quiz between the talk and the signing, which anyone could take part in by downloading a quiz app for their phones.

Throughout the evening John shared a few of his favourite jokes, many anecdotes from throughout his life and hinted towards upcoming and future projects, one of which sounds deliciously Yummy!




John discussed his close friend Graham Chapman, and how he felt the best way to posthumously celebrate him at a Monty Python reunion. John and the other members on Monty Python had been invited to appear on TV in the US, and they felt it only right that Graham made an appearance too, despite having passed away 10 years previously. They group pondered getting a cardboard cut out of him, or commemorating him in some way, and they decided they would asked Graham’s former boyfriend if they could take Grahams ashes over to the US.

On the night of the TV appearance the five members walked out, sat down, and placed Grahams urn on the table. About ten minutes into the interview one of them “accidentally” kicked Graham’s urn over and his ashes spilled out onto the desk. It was an absolute gem of a story, and Johns telling of it really had the audience in fits of laughter.

He also joked about the Monty Python show in London having the tagline “1 Down 5 To Go”, because Graham has died a couple of decades earlier. He mentioned that now that Terry Jones had also passed away, he expected either Eric Idle or Terry Gilliam to be next as neither were in a good state, leaving it in a battle between him and Michael Palin for the owner of the Monty Python name.

On the subject of Fawlty Towers, John told a story of how Basil Fawlty was based on a genuine owner of a hotel that he and the Monty Python team stayed at. The owner was so bad that a few of the team actually changed hotels after a couple of days to avoid having to deal with him.

With the insights into Monty Python, Basil Fawlty, Life of Brian and A Fish Called Wanda, this was the perfect event for a John Cleese fan like myself. I could have listened to him and Tom talk for hours and hours.

Overall the evening was superb. The new side area in the BEC Arena is perfect for small, intimate gatherings and the evening was managed perfectly with everyone being shown to their seats and a small bar serving cold drinks. Also, everything was perfectly wheelchair accessible. This is a great, intimate venue.

The full interview has been uploaded onto the Monopoly Events YouTube channel, and it is something that any John Cleese fan would find interesting. Watch it now below!

Go to Source – 80sNostalgia.com



An Evening With John Cleese in Manchester

This article is from 80sNostalgia.com. Click the title to hop over there.

John flippin Cleese!John Cleese is coming to Manchester on 19th July, to perform his one-man show An Evening With John Cleese at the BEC Arena.

The list of his Film and TV credits, as both a writer and as a performer, is immense! Co-creator of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, writer and actor in A Fish Called Wanda, and the Knight who had all his limbs chopped off in Monty Python and the Holy Grail. I’ve included a full list below for anyone who wants a recap on his career (not that you will need it – the man is a legend!)

The event will feature John in a Q&A session with fans, autograph and photograph shoots, and a limited number of meet & greet tickets. General entry tickets are £30, autograph and photograph opportunities need to be purchased in addition to entry tickets, VIP meet and greet tickets include entry, auto, photo and meet and greet.

If you would like to witness one of the UKs finest comedy writers and performers live on stage, or get an autograph from or a photo with, tickets are available here – https://www.acc360.co.uk/


Johns Career:

John first shot to fame with The Frost Report in 1966 and in 1969 co-created Monty Python’s Flying Circus. The team went on to conquer the world with four cult TV series and four hugely successful films, And Now For Something Completely Different (1971), Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1974), The Life of Brian (1979) and The Meaning of Life (1983). The Pythons reunited for a one-off series of 10 live stage shows in the UK in 2014.

After leaving Python, Cleese moved on to create Basil Fawlty, the hotel manager from hell in Fawlty Towers. As one of the most successful TV series ever made, the 12 episodes of Fawlty Towers have been repeated on the BBC many times.

In 1988, he starred in and co-wrote A Fish Called Wanda. He reunited the stars of Wanda in 1996 to make Fierce Creatures, a film about a zoo, which went on worldwide release in 1997.

As well as his work with Monty Python, Cleese’s film credits as an actor include The Great Muppet Caper (1980), Time Bandits (1980), Privates on Parade (1982) Silverado (1984), Clockwise (1986), Terry Jones’s Erik the Viking, Eric Idle’s Splitting Heirs (1992), Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1994), The Jungle Book (1995), The Wind in the Willows (1996), The Out-of-Towners (1999), and Rat Race (2001), Cleese has also appeared in both the James Bond, and Harry Potter movie series.

In his twilight years he passes his time writing film scripts, making speeches to business audiences, doing seminars on creativity, teaching at Cornell and constructing a virtual reality (his website, www.thejohncleese.com)

Go to Source – 80sNostalgia.com



Forgotten Filmcast Episode 151: Robot Carnival

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

On episode 151 of the Forgotten Filmcast, Todd is joined by Bubbawheat from Flights, Tights and Movie Nights to discuss the 1987 anime anthology Robot Carnival.

Download the Show:
iTunes
Podomatic
Your Listen

Show Notes:
Flights, Tights and Move Nights
Bubba on Twitter

Music:
“Protofunk” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



Juliet Bravo

This article is from 80sNostalgia.com. Click the title to hop over there.

Compared to today’s gritty, hard-hitting crime dramas Juliet Bravo seems rather tame but from 1980 to 1985 it was a frontrunner amongst police series on TV. Devised by the man behind The Sweeney, Ian Kennedy Martin, Juliet Bravo went through six series and two leading actresses, outlasting and outshining its rival, The Gentle Touch.

Set in the fictional town of Hartley in Lancashire (most of the filming was carried out in and around Bacup), the episodes usually dealt with minor crimes and incidents such as runaway teenagers, juvenile vandalism, domestic disputes and petty theft with a big tasty case thrown in every now and again to add a little spice.

Series 1 to 3 starred Stephanie Turner as Jean Darblay, the female inspector in charge of a small police station. She was replaced by Anna Carteret as Inspector Kate Longton for series 4 to 6. By the way, Juliet Bravo was the inspector’s call sign. The series centered on the inspector, highlighting her ups and downs in a male-dominated job and frequently taking a peek into her home life.

A fairly regular cast made up the police team working alongside the inspector, including David Ellison (Sergeant Joseph Beck), Noel Collins (Sergeant George Parish), Mark Botham (PC Danny Sparks) and CJ Allen (PC Brian Kelleher). These supporting characters were slowly developed as the series progressed and became very familiar to viewers in the early eighties.

Sergeant Beck was the no-nonsense, old school bobby who was always likely to give a young tearaway a thick ear. He had a flat cap, a dirty raincoat and a laid back attitude – and he kept pigeons! Sergeant Parish was a pie and pint deep thinker, a sounding board for the inspector. And the young constables were often the fall guys and the butt of jokes.

Each fifty minute episode told a different story but with continuity throughout the six series – minor characters would often crop up in different epiodes throughout. Juliet Bravo was also notable for early roles for young actors who went on to make a name for themselves such as Kevin Whately, Neil Morrissey and Joanne Whalley. There was also a liberal smattering of guest stars including Jean Boht, Bill Dean and Diana Coupland.

The jaunty theme music, arranged by Derek Goom, is quite catchy and would be great as your mobile phone ringtone. Try it!

Review submitted by Chris Green


Go to Source – 80sNostalgia.com



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