Category Archives: TV and Film

Forgotten Filmcast Episode 144: Gay Purr-ee

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

The new episode of the Forgotten Fillmcast is here! This time, Todd is joined by Tony Coogan from Coog’s Reviews to discuss the 1962 animated feature Gay Purr-ee, featuring the voices of Judy Garland and Robert Goulet.

Download the Show:
iTunes
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Your Listen

Show Notes:
Coog’s Reviews

Films Discussed:
Gay Purr-ee
Phantom Boy
Twice Upon a Time

Music:
“Protofunk” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



Forgotten Filmcast Episode 143: Original Gangstas

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

Get ready for a salute to the blaxploitation era on the new episode of the Forgotten Filmcast. This time, Todd is joined by Jeanette Ward from The Mundane Adventures of a Fangirl to discuss the 1996 film Original Gangstas, starring Fred Williamson, Jim Brown and Pam Grier.

Download the Show:
iTunes
Podomatic
Your Listen

Show Notes:
The Mundane Adventures of a Fangirl
Jeanette on Twitter

Movies Discussed:
Original Gangstas
Da 5 Bloods
Vigilante

Music:
“Protofunk” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



Ashens and the Polybius Heist

This article is from 80sNostalgia.com. Click the title to hop over there.

Polybius PosterRemember the 80s? Of course you do! That’s why you’re here, at an 80s site! And do you remember 80s arcade machines? (That’s a rhetorical question – there is no need to keep answering out loud from now on.)

If your favourite film genre is “80s retro gaming heists”, then you will certainly be adding Ashens and the Polybius Heist to your collection.

It is a genuinely funny and entertaining story about one mans quest to kidnap an 80s arcade machine from an impenetrable base. As with all 80s-based retro gaming heist movies, it starts in Norwich. A team of *skilled professionals is assembled, a *fool proof plot is hatched and a heist is *perfectly undertaken.

The cast includes Stuart Ashen, Daniel Hardcastle, Robert Llewellyn and a slew of upcoming comedians and YouTubers.

For those of you unfamiliar with the Polybius, the legend describes the game as part of a government-run psychology experiment released into arcades circa 1981, producing intense effects on the players. There are reports of people fighting each other for the next turn and, if you got the high score, entering into a euphoric trance.

The machines were then said to have been visited periodically by ‘men in black suits’ to analyse the effects. After rumours built of sensory deprivation, hallucinations and even some fatalities it was swiftly pulled from the market and never heard of again.

Today there are hundreds of videos, fan theories and pop culture references to the myth which continues to enthral fans around the world. The legend has been referenced in The Simpsons, Stranger Things and the fiction of Ernest Cline (Ready Player One, Armada). In 2017 a Polybius game was released on the Playstation (its creator Jeff Minter has a cameo in the film).

The film itself draws inspiration from some of the all time greats including Mission Impossible, Ocean’s 11 and The Italian Job. At times is it tense, funny and bizarre all at the same time – a combination of emotions I’ve never experienced together before.

Originally scheduled for a full cinema release, Ashens and the Polybius Heist is available to stream online from today, Thursday 19th November on Apple iTunes, Amazon Prime Video, Google Play, YouTube Movies and Vimeo on Demand.

Ashens and the Polybius Heist – not even a global pandemic can stop it.

Learn more :
Polybius Heist Website
Twitter

Buy, download and keep the film:
https://www.watchpolybiusheist.com/

Watch the Trailer:

Check out some pics:









*this may be a matter of perspective

Go to Source – 80sNostalgia.com



Forgotten Filmcast Episode 142: The Final Terror

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

It’s time for this year’s second Halloween episode of the Forgotten Filmcast. This time, Todd is joined by Chris Tanski from Fright Rags to discuss the 1983 slasher The Final Terror.

Download the Sbow:
iTunes
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Your Listen

Show Notes:
Fright Rags

Movies Discussed:
The Final Terror
Vampires vs the Bronx
Mortuary

Music:
“Protofunk” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



Forgotten Filmcast Episode 141: Beyond the Door

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

This year’s first Halloween episode of the Forgotten Filmcast is here! To start off the spookiness, Todd is joined by Brandon Peters from The Brandon Peters Show to discuss the 1974 Exorcist rip-off, Beyond the Door.

Download the Show:
iTunes
Podomatic
Your Listen

Show Notes:
The Brandon Peters Show
Brandon on Twitter

Movies Discussed:
Beyond the Door
The Visitor
Abby

Music:
“Protofunk” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



Mortuary

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

When I was a kid, one of the movie theaters I frequented would do a slideshow before the movie started. The slides would alternate between ads for upcoming movies and pictures of popcorn and soda pop. One of the movie ads that was burned in my mind featured the image of a gravestone with a hand reaching out of the ground in front of it. The movie was 1983’s Mortuary, which I used to always confuse with another 1983 film, Mausoleum. Now, that memorable poster image actually has nothing to do with the actual film; a largely forgotten and pretty effective slasher.

The film centers on a teenage girl named Christie (Mary Beth McDonough), who has been having a rough time since the death of her psychiatrist father. She has nightmares and occasionally sleepwalks until she finds herself up to her chin in the family’s pool. There are other strange goings on, though, as Christie’s friend Josh has recently vanished after having observed strange occult ceremonies taking place at the local mortuary where he once worked. Unknown to Christie and her boyfriend Greg (David Wallace), who also observed the weird ceremony, Josh was murdered by a black-cloaked figure. Oh, and did I mention that Christie’s mother (Lynda Day George) was also at the ceremony. And then there’s Paul (Bill Paxton), the awkward son of the mortuary owner, who has had a huge crush on Christie for years.

Well, as you may have figured, one night the hooded figure turns up at Christie’s home. Of course, when Christie tries to tell her mother about it, she writes it off as having been a dream. Soon it becomes clear, though, that this is no dream. When the mysterious man returns he captures Christie and drags her to the mortuary, where there is more than murder on the agenda.

Now, I guess I’ll throw up a spoiler alert here, but I don’t know how much of a spoiler this is. The reveal happens midway through the film, and you’ve probably figured this out already based on my brief synopsis.  Consider yourself warned, though. The killer is, of course, Paul. I suppose the filmmakers made some effort to disguise this with the ghoulish white latex that covers the killers face; but now, almost 40 years later, with the killer being played by the member of the cast who achieved the greatest fame, there’s no mistaking that that’s Bill Paxton under the hood. Plus, you don’t have to have a degree in mortuary science to know that the killer’s weapon of choice is an embalming tool, and it’s established early on that Paul works in his father’s mortuary.

Having said all that, Bill Paxton is definitely the highlight of the film. He pulls off being goofy and awkward when he’s just plain old Paul. There’s a scene where he literally skips through a cemetery after presenting Christie with a rose. When he’s the killer, though, he’s quite sinister and creepy. His actions are legit disturbing. Probably the film’s most graphic moment is when Paul kills Christie’s mother. Between the nature of the murder weapon, and the heavy breathing and writhing of Paxton as he plunges it into her, there’s definitely a sexual angle to this moment. Given that just a few minutes earlier, dear old mom was flirting with Christie’s boyfriend, Greg, the scene definitely has some unsettling layers.

In many ways the film feels like it’s what you get when you mix a soap opera with a slasher film. It centers on a small group of people in a affluent community who are all strangely intertwined. Christie’s dead father was a psychiatrist…Paul was his patient, struggling with his mother’s suicide…Christie’s mother is involved in a strange cult with Paul’s father…Paul has the hots for Christie. I wouldn’t have been surprised if Paul and Christie were actually siblings! 

Despite the soap-operish qualities, the film manages to be a very effective little slasher. In addition to the great performance from Bill Paxton, Mary Beth McDonough also excels as the object of his desire, Christie. There are a lot of great final girls in 80’s slasher films, but I can’t say that we the audience actually have legit concern for all of them. I found myself actually worried for Christie, and that was all on the strength of McDonough’s performance. McDonough is probably best known for appearing as Erin in the long-running, and exceedingly wholesome, TV series The Waltons. She grew up on that show, but here we are two years after it went off the air, and she is showing everyone she’s not a little girl anymore. She spends much of the movie in a revealing nightgown and has a fairly graphic love scene…which may have employed a body double, but still. Clearly, the fans of The Waltons were not the audience the filmmakers were going for.

Going back to that original poster image, though, there are absolutely no corpses reaching out of their graves in this movie. In the end, it didn’t matter that much. I can deal with misleading marketing when you deliver an effective and creepy slasher film like this. If that’s not enough for you,it’s a real treat to see Bill Paxton, an actor who would eventually hit it big, getting his start playing the killer in a teen horror film, and giving it all he’s got.

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



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