Category Archives: TV and Film

Forgotten Filmcast Episode 156: Turkey Shoot

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

On the new episode of the Forgotten Filmcast, Todd is joined by Elwood Jones from From the Depths of DVD Hell to delve into the realms of ozploitation cinema. Get ready for Brian Trenchard-Smith’s 1982 film Turkey Shoot.

Download the Show:
iTunes
Podomatic

Show Notes:
From the Depths of DVD Hell
Elwood on Twitter

Music:
“Protofunk” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



Forgotten Filmcast Episode 155: Phantom Lady

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

Episode 155 of the Forgotten Filmcast is here! This time, Todd is joined by author Christina Lane to discuss the 1944 producing debut of longtime Hitchcock collaborator Joan Harrison. Ella Raines and Franchot Tone star in Phantom Lady.

Download the Show:
iTunes
Podomatic

Show Notes:
Author Christina Lane
Phantom Lady: Hollywood Producer Joan Harrison, the Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock

Music:
“Protofunk” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



Rock Of Ages

This article is from 80sNostalgia.com. Click the title to hop over there.

You’ve GOT to be a fan of 80s rock music if you’re here, haven’t you? Of COURSE you are!

The musical Rock of Ages is currently showing at The Opera House Manchester and tells the story of two people falling in love – Drew (Luke Walsh) and Sherrie (Rhiannon Chesterman). Drew works at a nightclub called The Bourbon Room where he cleans and practises song writing. One night he meets Sherrie and asks Dennis, the owner of The Bourbon Room, if she can work there.

The Bourbon Room owner Dennis (Ross Dawes), is struggling to keep his club from from being demolished but takes on Sherrie as a host, where she and Drew start to fall for each other.

A love rival arrives on the scene and comes between Drew and Sherrie, in the form of loathsome ladies-man Stacee Jaxx. In the performance we went to watch the love rival character of Stacee Jaxx was played by Kevin Clifton off of Strictly on the telly.

The other main character, and by far the most enjoyable one in my opinion, was Lonny (Joe Gash) who played the parts of Bourbon Room employee and The Narrator brilliantly. Lonny delivered the perfect mix of one liners, clever quips and perfectly improvised comments. His character is meant to be over the top and flamboyant and Lonny achieves this perfectly.



There are quite a few laugh-out-loud moments in Rock of Ages, the most memorable of which for me was where Lonny and Dennis perform an acrobatic cartwheel scene. It needs to be seen to be understood why this is so good, but the aftermath of it was something genuinely hysterical and lead to a nice moment or two of improvisation.

Another funny touch was that all the transport used in Rock of Ages is a miniature version, so when Drew and Cherrie are heading out for a picnic the bike they are both sat on is child-sized. It certainly made the audience laugh a lot!

All the scenes are played out through the medium of 80s rock songs performed by a live band, so if you have ANY appreciation for 80s rock then this is the musical for you. Renditions of We Built This City and Here I Go Again went down a storm with the crowd, whereas ballads More Than Words and Every Rose Has It’s Thorn were sang beautifully.

Overall the evening was great, with the cast definitely finding their confidence more in the second half. There were certainly some giggles in the first half along with a few perfectly performed songs, but the second half was a lot stronger both in comedy and in musical performance.

Rock Of Ages is at the Opera House Manchester until Saturday 9th October.

Get tickets – https://www.rockofagesmusical.co.uk/tour/

Opera House Manchester
Twitter – https://twitter.com/PalaceAndOpera
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/PalaceandOpera/

Rock Of Ages Links:
Website – https://www.rockofagesmusical.co.uk/tour/
Twitter – https://twitter.com/rockofagesuk
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/rockofagesthemusical/


Gallery








Go to Source – 80sNostalgia.com



Heathers – The Musical

This article is from 80sNostalgia.com. Click the title to hop over there.

Heathers (the film) is one of the cult classics from the 80s. It told the story of an unknown girl at high school who wanted to become popular, and inadvertently became embroiled in a murder or three. Heathers The Musical is a modern, updated version, and my WORD is it good!

Heathers The Musical is set in Westerberg High School in the US and tells the story of a geeky girl called Veronica who, just like the majority of the other students, is trying to get through school relatively unscathed. Most of the students are equally looked down on by a set of three girls, all called Heather, who dominate their fellow students with callous and mean comments, and who each have inflated self importance and obnoxious attitudes. They only engage with people who can be of benefit to them, snubbing or berating anyone who dares so much as talk to them.

After recess The Heathers are caught out of class without a hall pass by a teacher, but before they can be penalised geeky Veronica steps in and presents a hastily forged hall pass which includes their names. The Heathers recognise Veronica’s ability to forge writing as being something they could use in future and allow her to join their clique. Veronica doesn’t necessarily like the Heathers but she instantly gains popularity, or rather she is no longer subject to quite as much ridicule from them, and she starts to enjoy school life more.

A new student by the name of J.D. joins Westerberg and Veronica instantly becomes besotted with him. J.D. helps Veronica to “address” the issues in her life, (and by “address” I mean “kill”,) and the play is about how the school comes to terms with the death of a Heather. And then the deaths of some more students. And then… (in fact, no, go and see it! It is awesome!)

Highlights for us were right at the start of Act 2, during the funeral, one of the Dads makes a speech about how proud he is of his son, and the audience erupted in supportive cheers. It was absolutely deafening and genuinely heart warming. It’s one of those things you only get at the theatre – you just don’t get that kind of emotion from the audience at the cinema.

At one point the teacher broke the fourth wall and had a brief conversation with an audience member. She asked him to stand up and a guy with a shaved head got out of his seat. She then proceeded to “break up” with him, stating “You have a lovely head of hair… It’s a shame you didn’t wear it tonight.” Again, the audience interaction was brilliant.

Also, there was a fight scene in slow motion which was absolutely fantastic. It was perfectly synchronised, with all cast members working at exactly the same speed. There was jeering, there were punches being thrown, it was a genuine fight but in slow motion. The amount of hours they must have rehearsed for, to get that level of synchronicity… Superb.

The musical numbers are fantastic with such catchy tunes, and everything is performed live by a band. Both sound and lighting were excellent, lighting especially, with spotlights used to accent the clothing colours of the Heathers and a single white spot used to highlight solos.

EVERYTHING about going to the theatre is ace – you’re not watching a recording on a screen, you’re watching live actors, you’re listening to a live band play music, the lighting is done live, the gasps and cheers from the audience, EVERYTHING about it makes it such a bigger event than going to the cinema. The Palace in Manchester is an excellent venue.

Heathers is at The Palace Theatre Manchester until Saturday 9th October, and tickets start from just £13. Just let that sink in… £13.00 to watch a live show in a theatre. Bonkers!

Get tickets for Heathers The Musical here – https://www.heathersthemusical.com/uk-tour

Explore The Palace and Opera House Manchester:
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/PalaceandOpera/
Twitter – https://twitter.com/PalaceAndOpera
Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/palaceandopera/



















Go to Source – 80sNostalgia.com



Forgotten Filmcast Episode 154: In Harm’s Way

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

Get ready for an epic World War II adventure that is just shy of three hours long, and still feels over-stuffed. DJ Valentine from Simplistic Reviews joins Todd to discuss John Wayne and Kirk Douglas in the 1965 film In Harm’s Way.

Download the Show:
iTunes
Podomatic

Show Notes:
Simplistic Reviews
DJ on Twitter

Music:
“Protofunk” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



Review – Bat Out Of Hell The Musical

This article is from 80sNostalgia.com. Click the title to hop over there.

This was our first outing into a social gathering setting since, well, y’know, the global apocalypse, and man alive I was excited! Even the walk up to The Opera House became exciting. As we approached, 30 Harley Davidsons drifted their way around the corner and formed a troupe in front of the Theatre. They sat there revving their machines, their emissions giving the air a petrol taste and and their communal roar deafening everyone nearby. It was AWESOME!



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Bat Out Of Hell The Musical is, essentially, a love story. The main plot revolves around Strat and Raven and how they develop feelings about each other. If I’m honest, calling it a love story between two people doesn’t really do it justice, because there is a lot more going on than just two people falling in love. There is a side story of Ravens parents, Falco and Sloane, who have grown apart over the years and who want to control their daughter. There is another side story where Strat’s best friend, Tink, secretly loves Strat and the jealousy that arises because of Strat’s obsession with Raven. And another one where Jagwire woos Zahara, Ravens carer. It is more, a LOT more, than just a love story.

The main reason most people will go to watch Bat Out Of Hell The Musical, I’m sure, will be because of the reference to rock legends Jim Steinman and Meatloaf. The play is filled with songs from Meatloaf’s albums, most notably Bat Out Of Hell 1 and 2. Every song is performed live by members of the cast, and each performance earned rapturous applause from the audience.

The stage is very well designed and incredibly well used, with only incidental props being positioned on the stage to enhance certain scenes. You can see a large sewer pipe opening, rocky cliff edge overlooking the city and an area used as Ravens bedroom. One very clever element is that they used an onstage camera person who captured a lot of action close-up, and their live video feed was projected onto the onstage screen. During specific scenes large props are brought on stage by the cast – a motorcycle, a dining table or a settee.

Glenn Adamson as Strat in BAT OUT OF HELL THE MUSICAL. Photo Credit - Chris Davis Studio(2)Highlights for me were when Falco and Sloane performed Paradise By The Dashboard Light on top of a car, reaching it’s inevitable conclusion where they’re “Praying for the end of time”, and at the Musical climax Raven burst in, ripped the engine out of the car and threw it off the front of the stage. Absolutely genius way to break that fourth wall and almost kill the orchestra!

Another highlight was “Two Out Of Three Ain’t Bad”, performed by Zahara and Jagwire. This genuinely gave me a massive punch in the feels. The choreography, the passion in the singing and the heartbreaking realisation that Zahara felt there would never be enough love between them. I don’t mind admitting I did tear-up a few times.

But the HUGE renditions of Bat Out Of Hell with Strat, and I’ll Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That) between Strat/Raven, Falco/Sloane and Zahara/Jagwire were absolutely phenomenal. The audience, myself included, applauded and cheered so hard after these, it was deafening.

The only thing that left me disappointed out of the entire night was that I was sat next to someone who ate their way through an entire box of Flying Saucers and didn’t offer me even one. Pfft! I could not fault the actors on stage though.

Bat Out Of Hell is at The Opera House in it’s spiritual home of Manchester until 2nd October, after which it embarks on a year long tour of the UK. All the dates can be found using the link below.

And you need to see it.

Bat Out Of Hell Musical UK Tour

Glenn Adamson as Strat in BAT OUT OF HELL THE MUSICAL. Photo Credit - Chris Davis Studio(2)







Go to Source – 80sNostalgia.com



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