Category Archives: TV and Film

Forgotten Filmcast Episode 154: In Harm’s Way

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

Get ready for an epic World War II adventure that is just shy of three hours long, and still feels over-stuffed. DJ Valentine from Simplistic Reviews joins Todd to discuss John Wayne and Kirk Douglas in the 1965 film In Harm’s Way.

Download the Show:
iTunes
Podomatic

Show Notes:
Simplistic Reviews
DJ on Twitter

Music:
“Protofunk” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



Review – Bat Out Of Hell The Musical

This article is from 80sNostalgia.com. Click the title to hop over there.

This was our first outing into a social gathering setting since, well, y’know, the global apocalypse, and man alive I was excited! Even the walk up to The Opera House became exciting. As we approached, 30 Harley Davidsons drifted their way around the corner and formed a troupe in front of the Theatre. They sat there revving their machines, their emissions giving the air a petrol taste and and their communal roar deafening everyone nearby. It was AWESOME!



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Bat Out Of Hell The Musical is, essentially, a love story. The main plot revolves around Strat and Raven and how they develop feelings about each other. If I’m honest, calling it a love story between two people doesn’t really do it justice, because there is a lot more going on than just two people falling in love. There is a side story of Ravens parents, Falco and Sloane, who have grown apart over the years and who want to control their daughter. There is another side story where Strat’s best friend, Tink, secretly loves Strat and the jealousy that arises because of Strat’s obsession with Raven. And another one where Jagwire woos Zahara, Ravens carer. It is more, a LOT more, than just a love story.

The main reason most people will go to watch Bat Out Of Hell The Musical, I’m sure, will be because of the reference to rock legends Jim Steinman and Meatloaf. The play is filled with songs from Meatloaf’s albums, most notably Bat Out Of Hell 1 and 2. Every song is performed live by members of the cast, and each performance earned rapturous applause from the audience.

The stage is very well designed and incredibly well used, with only incidental props being positioned on the stage to enhance certain scenes. You can see a large sewer pipe opening, rocky cliff edge overlooking the city and an area used as Ravens bedroom. One very clever element is that they used an onstage camera person who captured a lot of action close-up, and their live video feed was projected onto the onstage screen. During specific scenes large props are brought on stage by the cast – a motorcycle, a dining table or a settee.

Glenn Adamson as Strat in BAT OUT OF HELL THE MUSICAL. Photo Credit - Chris Davis Studio(2)Highlights for me were when Falco and Sloane performed Paradise By The Dashboard Light on top of a car, reaching it’s inevitable conclusion where they’re “Praying for the end of time”, and at the Musical climax Raven burst in, ripped the engine out of the car and threw it off the front of the stage. Absolutely genius way to break that fourth wall and almost kill the orchestra!

Another highlight was “Two Out Of Three Ain’t Bad”, performed by Zahara and Jagwire. This genuinely gave me a massive punch in the feels. The choreography, the passion in the singing and the heartbreaking realisation that Zahara felt there would never be enough love between them. I don’t mind admitting I did tear-up a few times.

But the HUGE renditions of Bat Out Of Hell with Strat, and I’ll Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That) between Strat/Raven, Falco/Sloane and Zahara/Jagwire were absolutely phenomenal. The audience, myself included, applauded and cheered so hard after these, it was deafening.

The only thing that left me disappointed out of the entire night was that I was sat next to someone who ate their way through an entire box of Flying Saucers and didn’t offer me even one. Pfft! I could not fault the actors on stage though.

Bat Out Of Hell is at The Opera House in it’s spiritual home of Manchester until 2nd October, after which it embarks on a year long tour of the UK. All the dates can be found using the link below.

And you need to see it.

Bat Out Of Hell Musical UK Tour

Glenn Adamson as Strat in BAT OUT OF HELL THE MUSICAL. Photo Credit - Chris Davis Studio(2)







Go to Source – 80sNostalgia.com



Bat Out Of Hell The Musical

This article is from 80sNostalgia.com. Click the title to hop over there.

Opening in Manchester on the 11th September, Jim Steinman’s spectacular musical Bat Out of Hell hits the highway on a 2021 UK tour.

Bringing to life the legendary anthems of Jim Steinman & Meat Loaf, this critically-acclaimed production uniquely combines the magic and excitement of a musical with the immense energy of rock ‘n’ roll. Join Strat, the forever young leader of rebellious gang ‘The Lost’ as he falls in love with Raven, the beautiful daughter of the tyrannical ruler of Obsidian.

This award-winning wild child musical thunders through powerhouse hits including I’d Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That), Paradise By The Dashboard Light, Two Out Of Three Ain’t Bad, Dead Ringer For Love and Bat Out of Hell, in an exciting over the top theatrical spectacle unlike any other.

THE BEST NIGHT OUT – GUARANTEED (with your clothes on!)

The tour run from September 2021 to November 2022 and is coming to over 20 venues. If you like the music of Meat Loaf, then this is a must-see!

Tickets are available here – https://www.batoutofhellmusical.com/uk-tour

ROCK!

Go to Source – 80sNostalgia.com



Forgotten Filmcast Episode 153: Maniac

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

On episode 153 of the Forgotten Filmcast, Todd is joined by Jack Criddle from Play Morricone for Me to look at one of the strangest films we’ve ever covered on the show. Get ready for 1934’s Maniac, from the grandfather of exploitation cinema, Dwain Esper. Some have called it one of the worst films ever made, so brace yourselves.

Download the Show:
iTunes
Podomatic

Show Notes:
Play Morricone for Me
Jack on Twitter

Music:
“Protofunk” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



Forgotten Filmcast Episode 152: Eyes of Laura Mars

This article is from Forgotten Films. Click the title to hop over there.

On the new episode of the Forgotten Filmcast, Todd is joined by Vince Leo from Around the World in 80’s Movies to look at a film originally written by John Carpenter, but he has since disowned it. Join us for 1978’s Eyes of Laura Mars, directed by Irvin Kershner, director of The Empire Strikes Back!

Download the Show:
iTunes
Podomatic
Your Listen

Show Notes:
Around the World in 80’s Movies
Vince on Twitter

Music:
“Protofunk” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Go to Source – Forgotten Films



An Evening With John Cleese

This article is from 80sNostalgia.com. Click the title to hop over there.

For people like me who enjoy Comiccons, 80s conventions and live events, lockdown has been a nightmare. When I first heard that John Cleese was coming to Manchester for An Evening With John Cleese, I was overjoyed. Skeptical, I will admit, but also overjoyed. I hadn’t been in a room with many people for over a year, so how would Monopoly Events handle a closed event like this?

The answer was, perfectly.

I arrived at Manchester BEC Arena, and was so pleased to see the event itself was in a side area rather than the main hall. This new side area gave the 300 or so ticket holders enough space so nobody felt too close in the waiting area, and the area in which John’s Q&A was held was perfectly sized for the audience numbers.

Now, a bit of background about me; John Cleese was one of my idols when I was young. I was a huge Monty Python fan, I had Clockwise, The Life Of Brian, And Now For Something Completely Different on video, and most of the Fawlty Towers episodes memorised line for line which my friends and I would recite. John Cleese is a comedy genius. There is always a worry when you meet idols, in that they might not live up to your expectations. John, however, was fantastic.

To set the scene for the evening, inside the Q&A area there was a low stage with a huge screen surrounding it. There were a limited number of seats, maybe 300 or so max, and each seat was allocated to a specific ticket or group if tickets had been booked together.

The host for the evening was Tom Finkill who did a fantastic job of ensuring John didn’t go off track and of putting great questions to John. Tom seemed to know his stuff when it came to John’s career, which gave a friendly warmth to his hosting.

The schedule for the evening was for John to give an hour long chat, then take questions from the audience, before people were able to have items signed by him. There was also a John Cleese themed quiz between the talk and the signing, which anyone could take part in by downloading a quiz app for their phones.

Throughout the evening John shared a few of his favourite jokes, many anecdotes from throughout his life and hinted towards upcoming and future projects, one of which sounds deliciously Yummy!




John discussed his close friend Graham Chapman, and how he felt the best way to posthumously celebrate him at a Monty Python reunion. John and the other members on Monty Python had been invited to appear on TV in the US, and they felt it only right that Graham made an appearance too, despite having passed away 10 years previously. They group pondered getting a cardboard cut out of him, or commemorating him in some way, and they decided they would asked Graham’s former boyfriend if they could take Grahams ashes over to the US.

On the night of the TV appearance the five members walked out, sat down, and placed Grahams urn on the table. About ten minutes into the interview one of them “accidentally” kicked Graham’s urn over and his ashes spilled out onto the desk. It was an absolute gem of a story, and Johns telling of it really had the audience in fits of laughter.

He also joked about the Monty Python show in London having the tagline “1 Down 5 To Go”, because Graham has died a couple of decades earlier. He mentioned that now that Terry Jones had also passed away, he expected either Eric Idle or Terry Gilliam to be next as neither were in a good state, leaving it in a battle between him and Michael Palin for the owner of the Monty Python name.

On the subject of Fawlty Towers, John told a story of how Basil Fawlty was based on a genuine owner of a hotel that he and the Monty Python team stayed at. The owner was so bad that a few of the team actually changed hotels after a couple of days to avoid having to deal with him.

With the insights into Monty Python, Basil Fawlty, Life of Brian and A Fish Called Wanda, this was the perfect event for a John Cleese fan like myself. I could have listened to him and Tom talk for hours and hours.

Overall the evening was superb. The new side area in the BEC Arena is perfect for small, intimate gatherings and the evening was managed perfectly with everyone being shown to their seats and a small bar serving cold drinks. Also, everything was perfectly wheelchair accessible. This is a great, intimate venue.

The full interview has been uploaded onto the Monopoly Events YouTube channel, and it is something that any John Cleese fan would find interesting. Watch it now below!

Go to Source – 80sNostalgia.com



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